Stem Cells Slow the Rate of Decline in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Stem Cells Slow the Rate of Decline in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Progressive supranuclear palsy, also known as PSP, is a disorder of the brain that gets worse over time (progressive neurodegenerative disorder). Many progressive supranuclear palsy symptoms are similar to Parkinson’s disease. These include rigidity, slowness of movement, cognitive (thinking) problems, difficulty speaking, and difficulty swallowing. While people with Parkinson’s disease can have an unsteady gait…

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Posted and filed under ALS, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Multiple Sclerosis.
Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation for MS and ALS

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation for MS and ALS

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis(ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are two separate diseases with some important similarities. Both ALS and MS interfere with a person’s ability to move. In both diseases, nerve cells are affected. In fact, in both diseases, cells of the immune system seem to attack and destroy the material that wraps…

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Posted and filed under Bone Marrow, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Multiple Sclerosis.
Posted and filed under ALS, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Stem Cell Therapy.
Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of ALS

Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS is a neurological disease that causes muscle weakness, profound disability, and ultimately death. ALS is sometimes referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, named for the New York Yankee baseball player who developed the condition later in his life. Notably, physicist Stephen Hawking long suffered from the condition. ALS affects the…

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Posted and filed under ALS, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Stem Cell Research.
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells are Safe and Well-Tolerated in ALS

Mesenchymal Stromal Cells are Safe and Well-Tolerated in ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurologic disorder that causes muscle weakness, and disability. In ALS, nerve cells degenerate causing muscle weakness and atrophy. ALS affects the nerve cells that connect the brain to the spinal cord (upper motor neurons), and nerve cells that connect the spinal cord to muscles (lower motor neurons). While…

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